Wee Green Cinema programme Sunday 3 July

12 NOON WEE GREEN CINEMA TENT

Landfill HarmonicLANDFILL HARMONIC (84 mins, NC-age advice-PG, 2015)

Landfill harmonic follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, a Paraguayan musical youth group of kids that live next to one of South America’s largest landfills. This unlikely orchestra plays music from instruments made entirely out of rubbish from the landfill. When their story goes viral on You Tube, the orchestra is catapulted into the global spotlight and they must navigate this new world of arenas and sold out concerts. However, when a natural disaster devastates their community, the orchestra provides a source of hope for the town. The film is a testament to the transformative power of music and the resilience of the human spirit. Watch the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCjbd21fYV8

FROM 1PM LUNCH FROM UNITY WORLD CAFE & FOOD BANK 

1.30PM

logo-bignoise

Following the film there will be a short performance from local orchestra BIG NOISE GOVANHILL formed by children in the Govanhill area.

 2-5PM OUTSIDE AREA, POLLOKSHIELDS PLAYHOUSE

Inspired by LANDFILL HARMONIC RAGS TO RICHES will run a special upcycling workshop -learn how to MAKE YOUR OWN MUSICAL INSTRUMENT from thrown away objects! No experience necessary, all ages and capabilities catered for.

Rags to Riches is an award winning upcycling project tackling post-consumer waste creatively and effectively whilst engaging with members of the community who wish to learn new skills, reduce the impact on and improve the environment, and improve wellbeing

.unnamed

2-4PM OUTSIDE AREA, POLLOKSHIELDS PLAYHOUSE

Come meet local organic food and urban gardening organisations to find out more about their work.  In attendance will be Hidden Gardens at Tramway, Harvest Co-op, South Seeds, Urban Roots and Waste Not Want Not will decamp from their normal Sunday afternoon slot at Kinning Park Complex to come to Wee Green Cinema.

http://www.harvestco-op.com

http://southseeds.org

http://www.urbanroots.org.uk

Home

2-4 PM POLLYWOOD SCREENINGS, SHIPPING CONTAINER

Pollywood are screening the following short film programmes in the shipping container on the hour between 2pm and 4pm:

2 PM Family Friendly Eco Shorts (N/C-age advice U) – A selection of family friendly films looking at environmental issues. The films:

Little Pumpkin Feeds the World

Our Oceans

The Ballad of Holland Island House

My Strange Grandfather

3 PM Community Food & Growing Shorts (N/C-age advice PG) – from Drumchapel to Detroit via Pollokshields a medley of tasty treats, about the importance of communities growing, producing and sharing food, to get your teeth in to. The films:

South Seeds Film

The Making of Flat Pack Meals

Mr Shafiq, Albert Drive Project

3 Acres in Detroit

4PM WEE GREEN CINEMA TENT

Can You Dig This

CAN YOU DIG THIS (80mins, N/C-age advice PG, 2015)

South Los Angeles. What comes to mind is gangs and drugs, not beautiful gardens. As part of an urban gardening movement taking root in South LA, people are planting flowers and vegetables to transform their neighborhoods. Calling for people to put down their guns and pick up their shovels, these “gangster gardeners” are creating an oasis in the middle of one of the most notoriously dangerous places in America. CAN YOU DIG THIS follows the inspirational journeys of four unlikely gardeners, discovering what happens when they put their hands in the soil. Watch the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/129924807

FROM 6PM EVENING FOOD: CURRY FOR SALE FROM JALDIKATESSEN  

6.30 PM WEE GREEN CINEMA TENT

JUST EAT IT: A FOOD WASTE STORY (75mins, N/C-age advice PG, 2015)

Where is your food going? Filmmakers and food lovers Jen and Grant dive into the issue of food waste from farm, through retail, all the way to the back of their own fridge. After catching a glimpse of the billions of dollars of good food that is tossed each year in North America, they pledge to quit grocery shopping and survive only on discarded food. What they find is truly shocking.  Variety called JUST EAT IT “hugely entertaining, will leave audiences gobsmacked” Watch the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/88023628

Just Eat It_photo1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wee Green Cinema Programme-Saturday 2 July, 2016

11.30AM WEE GREEN CINEMA TENT 

wall-e-wallpaper-wall-e-6412244-1280-10241

WALL-E (95mins, U, 2008)

WALL-E (Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-class) is the last robot left on Earth, 700 years in the future. WALL-E spends his days tidying up the planet, one piece of rubbish at a time, until he finds a green plant sprouting up from the ground which leads him to meet another robot EVE (Extraterrestrial Vegetation Evaluator). WALL-E is both a beautiful and enjoyable love story from Disney PIXAR animation and a powerful warning about the impact of human consumption on the environment, for kids and adults alike. Watch trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alIq_wG9FNk

FROM 1PM LUNCH FROM UNITY CAFE  & FOOD BANK 

1-4PM OUTSIDE AREA, POLLOKSHIELDS PLAYHOUSE

Come meet local cycling organisations to find out more about how you and your kids can get on your bikes!

Pollokshields based Soul Riders will be along to talk about what they are up to at their bike workshop and to provide Dr Bike services. They will also lead a bike ride around the local area after the screening of WADJDA (film at 4pm, bike ride at 5.45pm)

https://www.facebook.com/SoulRiders-Scotland-264169043702850/?ref=hlhttps://twitter.com/soulriderscot

Play on Pedals is a project supported by players of People’s Postcode Lottery, getting preschool children across Glasgow cycling before they start school.

Play on Pedals will giving parents and guardians information and also offering a free kids bike check over

https://playonpedals.com

1-4 PM POLLYWOOD SCREENINGS, SHIPPING CONTAINER

Pollywood  Community Cinema are screening the following short film programmes in the shipping container on the hour between 1pm and 4pm:

1 PM Family Friendly Cycling Shorts (N/C-age advice U) –a selection of family friendly animations including a cycling elephant, an old bike and lots more…. The films:

LVDE_still10The Elephant and the Bike

Home Sweet Home

Old Bike

Bike Sounds

Evolution of Bike

2 PM Cycling Shorts (N/C-age advice PG) – a collection of short documentaries about cycling from around the world exploring how cycling groups and projects are improving people’s live and helping to build communities. The films:

For the Love of Cycling

Fixed on Fixed

True Wheel

3 PM Community Shorts (N/C-age advice PG) – a programme of films looking at how we understand everyday kindness, what’s important about knowing our neighbours and how strong communities are built.  The films:

Flowers & Floorboards

Albert Drive Project Trailer

4PM WEE GREEN CINEMA TENT

WADJDA (93 mins, PG, 2014)

Wadjda is an 11-year-old Saudi girl who dreams of owning the beautiful green green bicycle that she passes in a shop every day on her way to school.  She wants to beat her best friend Abudullah in a bike race but her family and society all say that bikes are not for girls…WADJDA was the first feature film every shot in Saudia Arabia, a country where cinemas are banned, and directed by Haifaa Al –Manour, Saudi’s first female director. Nominated for a Best Foreign Film BAFTA in 2014 and described by Indiewire as “unmissable” and by Mark Kermode as “a terrific film…you sit there watching it with a smile on your face.” Watch the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3koigluYOH0

wadjda

5.45PM BIKE RIDE

Followed WADJDA, we will continue to celebrate cycling with a bike ride lead and guided by local cycling organization Soul Riders- explore the Southside by bike! Approx. Duration: 1 hour. No experience of cycling necessary, all abilities and ages welcome.

11140304_828418383944577_2706348372564079992_n

FROM 7PM EVENING FOOD: CURRY FOR SALE FROM JALDIKATESSEN  

7.30PM WEE GREEN CINEMA TENT

YOU’VE BEEN TRUMPED (PG 15-100 mins)

In this David and Goliath story for the 21st century, a group of proud Scottish homeowners take on Donald Trump. At stake is one of Britain’s very last stretches of wilderness. After the Scottish Government overturns its own environmental laws to give Trump the green light, local residents make their last stand against the golf course in the face of police harassment, constant legal threats and interruption of their water and electricity. Director Anthony Baxter himself makes international news after being thrown in jail. For Trump, the golf course is just another deal, with a possible billion-dollar payoff, for the residents, it represents the destruction of a globally unique landscape that has been the backdrop of their lives. A film just a relevant now as when it was first released in 2012. Watch the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjAIKgOOc8A

youve-been-trumped 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local Pick: Restless Natives (1985)

Unknown

Ruth Thomas: [hearing chanting] What’s that?

Dr. Moreau: The natives, they have a curious ceremony. Mr. Parker has witnessed it.

Ruth Thomas: Tell us about it, Edward.

Edward Parker: Oh, it’s… it’s nothing.

Dr. Moreau: They are restless tonight.

Island of Lost Souls, 1933

A restless native is a peculiar character, a trope left behind from the days of 19th century colonialism, he is typically accompanied by tribal drumming, shamanistic chanting, and highly suspect, irrational behaviours. A year after the referendum, it is perhaps clearer than ever that this colonial subject isn’t just restricted to ‘deepest, darkest Africa’, he might also don a kilt and drink Tennent’s.

The two protagonists of Michael Hoffman’s 1985 comedy, like their African predecessors written in the imagination of khaki-clad missionaries, wear scary masks and terrorise invading tourists. Modern highwaymen, they capture the (American) enemy, and in doing so capture local favour – as an angry young Scot, it’s hard not to savour the blundering oppressor’s comeuppance. Restless Natives mines the rage of any local who has tried to navigate the Royal Mile during Fringe season.

Ronnie and Will live in Scotland: The Socialist Utopia, where their conscience pangs more for wasting the taxpayer’s hard earned keep than for the robbery of innocent tourists: its Rob Roy meets Robin Hood set against the backdrop of high Thatcherism and the rolling Munros of the Highlands.

Released in the same year as The Breakfast Club and The Goonies, Restless Natives is a sharp comedy that finds itself commenting on the discontent of the Scottish youth in sharp relief against the starry-eyed American cinema of the time. Somewhere in between Gregory’s Girl and In Bruges, Hoffman’s film is a touching black comedy that celebrates Scottish adolescence, warts and all.

There’s beautiful scenery, young love, armed robbery, bad haircuts, and a decapitated Maggie Thatcher; what more could you want?

Watch the trailer here :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tM9rUC18JFs

 

Local Pick: The Angels’ Share (2012)

The Angels' Share

One of Ken Loach’s most recent films, The Angels’ Share offers great one-liners with a biting hit of reality. We follow the protagonist Robbie as he tries to stay on the right side of the tracks for the sake of his partner and newborn son. He finds himself attempting to avoid old enemies, before falling in with a bunch of fairly harmless miscreants to pull off a daring and slightly ridiculous heist.

I was enchanted by The Angels’ Share from the first watch, even from the opening scene. In one of the most memorable, and certainly one of my favourite openings to a film, a drunkard in a tracksuit with a bottle of Buckie stumbles around on the railway tracks, with the stationmaster agitating over the tannoy, trying to get him out of the way of the train. This introduces the first of the unlikely group of leads in this adventurous romp.

They all meet doing community service for their various crimes, and when rewarded by their supervisor, Harry, with a trip to a distillery, they are inspired to hatch a plan to steal a rare, expensive whisky. It feels cheap, too obvious, to compare it to The Full Monty, but this is an underdog tale in the same vein but much wittier and sharper, set to a background of on-going Glaswegian family feuds. It balances humour, reality and poignancy very well, with a bit of adventure too. It’s not all plain sailing as they set off for the highlands, four Glaswegians camping out for their whisky, and hatching plans to break in with shamefaced innocence and blagging; but you are desperately keen for them to succeed.

There’s no sugar-coating either from Loach in his representation of the violent and difficult world in which the group live. Robbie meets a young man he’d assaulted, the crime for which he is serving his community service, and we see in painful detail his violence and him trying to come to terms with his actions and their after-effects.

The whisky talk is good too; I’m a very ignorant whisky lover, and felt at home watching the group sampling the miniatures stolen from the distillery (“You smell the peat?” “Who the fuck is Pete?”). Robbie is discovered to have a good nose for whisky and thus everything starts to fall into place for him and his young family. The film celebrates aspects of Scotland, with beautiful rolling landscapes, good whisky, kilt jokes, filthy humour, but avoids being too saccharine with its naturalistic dialogue (many of the leads are non-professional actors) and the real struggle of Robbie to keep free of what seems to be an inevitable life of crime. Yeah, it closes with 500 Miles too.

I’m not Glaswegian, but have adopted the city as mine and am filled with unabashed joy for Scotland when I watch this film. The title comes from the so-named minute portion of whisky that evaporates in the cask. I like the Robin Hood feel to the film; they take their Angels’ Share. You can’t condemn them as criminals, just fans after a little adventure who take their part fair and square, and reward those who helped them along their way. It’s one of those films where you really, really, want to read that it is based on a true story. Alas no.

Trip to a distillery with some empty Irn Bru bottles, anyone?

Local Pick: The Wicker Man (1973)

Set on the fictitious Scottish island of “Summerisle”, The Wicker Man follows Edward Woodward as the pious police Sergeant Howie, visiting from the mainland to investigate the disappearance of a local girl. To Howie’s shock, he discovers the local population, who still observe ancient Pagan rites and rituals, are unwilling to assist in his investigation, and instead deny the missing girl’s very existent.

The Wicker Man

Howie’s disgust grows as he witnesses more and more of the strange attitude and behaviour of the residents, from frog-eating children, to naked dancing around standing stones, and to fire worship. His faith and vow of abstinence is tested by the temptation of Britt Ekland, in one scene found undulating against her bedroom wall in the nude. Beautifully played by Woodward, we see Howie’s moral stance against their unchristian practices grows into an intense hatred. His mistrust and suspicion intensifies as he observes the under-stated subservience of the population to the eccentric but charming Lord Summerisle (a titanic performance by recently deceased horror icon, Christopher Lee), and Howie feels a desperate need to solve this mystery with an increasing sense of urgency as the island preparations for the upcoming May Day festival menacingly loom.

The film is chilling, not only in the bold imagery (for example, the ritualistic donning of dead-eyed animal masks) but also in the tension of Anthony Schaffer’s screenplay, which so convincingly portrays this secret world. The audience, like Howie, is plunged into this mysterious community and is given no surety with which to understand or predict what might come next, nor what depths of depravity are already occurring out of sight.

What finally does occur is surely one of the most terrifying and memorable climaxes in cinematic history…but I won’t spoil it.

Robin Hardy’s 1973 The Wicker Man is a bona fide classic of the horror/suspense genre. Largely ignored in on its initial release due to studio edits and a limited screenings, it has gathered a growing “cult” following and inspired an annual Scottish alternative music festival (not to mention spawning the infamous 2006 remake starring Nicholas Cage, which singlehandedly redefined human and bee interaction for the screen). I for one would love to see this eerie Scottish classic on the big screen, vote for The Wicker Man in the Southside Film Festival Local Pick….”You’ve got to keep your appointment with The Wicker Man.”

by Colin McLaughlin

Watch the trailer for The Wicker man here:

Local Pick: Under the Skin (2013)

Jonathan Glazer’s third film, Under the Skin, follows Scarlett Johansson as an unearthly creature disguised as nameless woman who prowls the streets of Glasgow, luring male victims into her lair to be swallowed into pools of black viscous matter. The film opens with a Kubrickian composition of creation: a pinhole of light that expands into a celestial and planetary crescendo, before transforming into an eye, blinking and seeing for the first time. Perception is rendered critical here, and Glazer works to create a film that foregrounds a strikingly unemotional gaze.

under-the-skin_reflections

The film strips the plot of Michel Faber’s debut novel back to an almost wordless dance between Johansson’s stalking predator and her unwitting victims. It is dominated by silences that render the scenes otherworldly to the viewer, and Johansson and her motorbike riding minder seem to communicate without language. At the inception of Johansson’s human form in the opening scene, we hear her finding her voice through repeated nasal articulations. Glazer is careful to ensure she is not invested with a kind of infant-like curiosity here, but rather voices as if testing an instrument. When Johansson does speak in her clipped yet regionless English accent, her voice is as much an alien presence in the buzz of the thick Glaswegian dialect as is her physicality. She coyly asks her victims, ‘Do you think I’m pretty?’ and the answer is always fatally affirmative.

Under the Skin plays with the incongruity of Johansson as sex symbol and movie star suddenly hanging around Sauchiehall Street at night, and uses this consciously to construct an unsentimental strangeness. It is bleak and bold in its treatment of the frame as an objective lens, the emotionless eye of Johansson as dangerous seductress. It is through this detachment that the film achieves it goal of creating a world that is acutely depersonalized. My own reaction after viewing the film in the cinema was one of environmental bewilderment; on the walk home, everything that had seemed commonplace was suddenly transmogrified into oddity.

This evisceration of the familiar is bolstered and cemented by Johansson’s remarkable performance. She is supremely blank – all surface, and reactive only in minutia, a dearth where her personality should be. When coupled with the astonishing and haunting score composed by Mica Levi who uses violins to conjure up and cloak the film in an unsettling and eerie tonal shroud, Johansson has never seemed more conflictingly malevolent yet vulnerable.

The scenes in which Johansson ensnares her victims in her lair, silently siren-like with her nude body, become as reverse-births, the men floating in suspended animation in a kind of amniotic fluid that destroys rather than creates. Amongst this complex thematic framework, the film balances the juxtaposition of the fantastic with the mundane. When placed alongside each other, the two generic and tonal aspects of the film – social realism vs. futuristic science fiction – initially seem incompatible. But instead the contrast works with startling success by having the effect of amplifying one another.

While much of the film’s first half is concerned with this cycle of hunt-lure-kill, as it moves forward we realize at its heart it is about the acquisition of empathy. We gradually witness Johansson’s character begin to develop morality, and an encounter with a man suffering from neurofibromatosis catalyses her into an existential crisis as she is confronted with an urge to be benevolent.   Much like Birth, Glazer’s misunderstood 2004 sophomoric effort, Under the Skin is a film that attempts to bridge the gap between big ontological and philosophical questions about the nature of existence and the definition of humanity, and as Johansson replaces the urban grit for bleak moors and forests, the film dares to ask at what point does a person become human.

Since it premiered in 2013, and as the buzz around it has increased and abated over the past few years, it has drawn its fair share of detractors as well as admirers. I think part of Under the Skin’s divisiveness lies somewhere in its attempt to broach these broad questions of what defines a human through a scheme of juxtaposing the familiar with the uncanny. Glazer doesn’t create a cinematic space that attempts to answer these questions for the viewer, but rather purposely removes explanation from all aspects (this includes denying the comfort of a clearly stated motivation for Johansson’s culling of lusty men). This is a film that is fundamentally about atmosphere, and Glazer invokes highland mist and deserted high-rises as visual metaphors for the film’s interest in obscurity and uncertainty. Definitely, Under the Skin resists ease, but it will simultaneously draw you in to its erotic and murky blackness.

by Ryan McNab

Watch the trailer for this film here:

Local Pick: Ratcatcher (1999)

Painting a bleak picture of outdated housing estates in Glasgow in the 1970’s, Ratcatcher follows the twelve-year-old James after the drowning of his friend Ryan, an incident in which James seems to be more involved than anyone has noticed. The bin men are on strike and the tenants gradually being moved to better housing, leaving behind the decrepit rat-infested tower blocks. Slowly the world around James changes, as his family wait to be moved on. He finds solace in rare glimpses of nature, as well as his companions; an older girl, Margaret, passive receiver of abuse from the local gang, and younger boy Kenny, steadily losing his young innocence and compassion, in loosely connected scenes showing the lives of those habiting the uninhabitable. It might be the 1970’s, but it’s not a million miles away from the Victorian era, with only outside toilets and beds shared between three in this examination of an almost unbelievable but true social housing policy.

Ratcatcher (1999)

 Despite the perpetual depictions of poverty in the dank, grey, high-rise world of the housing estate, I found the film oddly beautiful. Ramsey’s film is carefully composed around shots teetering on the edge of long, strange silences, contrasted with a gentle humour that creates an eerie, sometimes uncomfortable watch. Opening by a canal, where the young of the estate return throughout the film, nature works its way into the cracks of the inner-city world. The first glimpse of real colour and light comes late to the film, when James escapes on the bus to a corn field, and finally there is blue sky. Children play with the rats that their parents try to escape from, and are fascinated by the lice that inhabit their hair. This might be a portrayal of incredibly difficult living conditions that are far more recent than seems feasible, but it also shows childhood, growing up, and coping with situations you are too young to deal with.

I love the unexpectedly surreal aspects: a pet mouse floating away on a helium balloon; Margaret using one of the many uncollected bin bags as a cushion to enjoy her jam sandwich, enjoying the quiet in this peaceful moment she has found. This occasional playfulness, whilst simultaneously dealing with difficult subjects, is what sets the film away from what it could have been in the hands of a lesser director: a straight depiction of an unkind world through which James leads us. He visits new houses, waiting to be inhabited, their furnishings still covered in plastic sheeting. He tries out the new shiny baths, the shining porcelain toilet not yet plumbed in, into which he joyfully pisses, only to see a puddle slowly appear underneath. This gentle, quiet, creeping humour remains throughout the film, sweetening the toughness, and reminding us that it is just normal life, a boy’s adventures, being shown. And it is also tough. Violence, death, drowning and discontent are inescapable, and in several scenes you really feel like you’re waiting for the worst to happen. This film strikes me as one of the most enjoyably uneasy films to watch, as you are brought out of prolonged calmness with sudden loud noises or shouts.

I watch this film as a stranger, an outsider not just to this world but also to much of Glasgow; to those who remember the housing estates of the seventies it must be an entirely different experience. The characters seem to watch on too, looking through windows, observing their world, and we see their desire to escape, as well as their children’s. The film steers clear of sentimentality, but shows subtle, everyday moments of happiness. This sometimes bizarre and unexpected mix is what charmed me. Slightly dreamlike, we see James’ world, and through this meditation on life in these estates, a representation of what was a normal world for many.

by Henrietta Eagle Wilsher

Watch the film’s trailer here:

Call for FOH Volunteers for Comedy Film Screenings

Southside Film is a volunteer run organisation that hosts an annual film festival and regular film screenings and events throughout the year. We are looking for new FOH volunteers for our late night  comedy film screenings at Govanhill Baths over two weekends in March, part of Glasgow Comedy Festival.

Screening details:
Fri 13 March: American: The Bill Hicks Story (15)
Sat 14 March: Witnail & I (15)
Fri 20 March: In the Loop (15)
Sat 21 March: Best in Show (12)

All screenings are in Govanhill Baths on 99 Calder St, Govanhill, Southside Glasgow, G42 7RA.
All screenings start at 10pm and volunteer shifts will be from 9pm to midnight. Cost of taxis home/travel expenses will be covered.

Volunteers on any one shift get free entry to all other screenings over the two weekends in March and opportunity to get involved in future Southside Film screenings and activities.

We are looking for friendly and helpful FOH volunteers who will be able to check and take tickets, direct people into the screenings, help with any other enquires from the audience and tidy up the screening space after screenings.

Experience in a previous customer service role, paid or voluntary, is desirable. Interest in cinema and filmmaking is also desirable for this role. Knowledge of Govanhill Baths and the Southside of Glasgow is preferable but not essential. Volunteers should be 18 years old or over.

Please send your CV along with a note of your available dates to volunteer to Karen O’Hare at southsidefilmfest@gmail.com by 5pm on Tuesday 3 March.

Call for Volunteers- Treasurer & Secretary

Southside Film is looking for new volunteers in the key roles of Treasurer & Secretary 

Southside Film is dedicated to bringing film back to Southside Glasgow, an area with no local cinema and, until Southside Film started in May 2011, no regular film screenings or events.

We plan to run the film festival in October 2015 and to continue to provide screenings and film events throughout 2015. We are looking for new volunteers to fill the key roles of Secretary and Treasurer.  Are you interested in joining us?

Role description: Treasurer

Managing the box office at screenings/events which includes:
– ordering and collecting printed tickets or creating ticket info for online sales prior to screenings; 
– organising floats for screenings/events and managing box office sales at screenings/events;
– banking cash after screenings
– submitting box office figures to distributors.

Coordinating, checking and processing volunteer expense claims.


Monitoring the bank account and acting as signature on the bank account.

Responsible for paying invoices on time and liasing with film distributors and filmmakers re payments.

Reporting on finances at Southside Film monthly meetings including producing an income/ ticket reconciliation per screening and producing an annual financial report.

Produce final company accounts and submit to HMRC annually.
 

Have a shared responsibility with the company directors for ensuring that CIC paperwork is filed and  for the payment of annual company fees and taxes.

Optional company director role.

Role description: Secretary

Organising, preparing agendas for meetings and taking minutes at monthly meetings.

Keeping a true and accurate record of these minutes and circulating the minutes to everyone involved.

Assist with all Southside Film correspondence including email, press and online correspondence.

Overseeing the updating and maintenance of various social media channels and the Southside Film website.

Coordinate the e-newsletter communication – promote, collect and administrate the monthly Mail Chimp e-newsletter to those signed up to the Southside Film mailing list.

Coordinate the design, printing and distribution of flyers and posters for Southside Film year round 
activity. 

Manage the administration of Southside Filmmakers Award entries and award at annual film festival.


Coordinate the evaluation and monitoring of screenings and/or events including producing, distributing and collecting monitoring and evaluation forms and then collating this info into event and annual reports.


Help to source and organise film prints and licenses and liaise with film distributors and filmmakers.


Coordinate the booking of screening venues and liaise with venue contacts.


Volunteering at screenings and/or events.


Have a shared responsibility with company directors for ensuring CIC paperwork is filed and overseeing other company related correspondence.


Optional company director role.


We expect that the Treasurer and Secretary will have to commit approximately half a day a month to Southside Film activity, to attend monthly two hour meetings in the Southside and to attend screenings and events during the film festival in October 2015 and throughout the year when possible.

Southside Film is volunteer run and operates as a community interest company, investing any profits back into the organisation to provide future free or affordable film screenings, events, workshops and other opportunities.

These roles are voluntary but as per the festival’s Volunteer Policy, expenses will be covered.

Find out more about Southside Film here: 
http://southsidefilm.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/SouthsideFilmFestival 
http://twitter.com/southfilmfest

Please apply by sending your CV and/or web link to Karen O’Hare at southsidefilmfest@gmail.com along with a statement explaining what you bring to the festival and why you want to support Southside Film.

Deadline is 5pm, 17 February, 2015.

First 2015 screenings announced

Happy New Year everyone! 





We have a special sci fi screening on Tues 20th Jan of Death Watch shot in Glasgow in 1979 and starring Harvey Kietel and featuring Southsider Robbie Coltrane in his first film role. Part of BFI Sci-FI, together with O2 bfi.org.uk/scifi  Thanks to Film Hub Scotland for their support of this screening.
In February we team up with Scottish Queer International Film Festival (SQIFF) to screen Hit So Hard a documentary about Patty Schemel, celebrated drummer in the band Hole, part of LGBT History Month.
In March we continue the music theme with The Possibilities are Endless, the beautiful film about Edwin Collins’ recovery but also about the power of music and love.
In April at The Glad Cafe in the run up to Record Store day we are screening Sound it Out, a documentary about the last remaining record store in Teeside.

We also have special late night screenings in The Steamie at Govanhill Baths for Glasgow Comedy Festival. Don’t miss cult comedy classic Withnail & I the hilarious mockumentary Best in Show, cutting satire of In the Loop and The Bill Hicks Story about a seriously funny comedian taken too soon from this world.

Advance online ticket sales for all screenings available from http://www.wegottickets.com/southsidefilmfestival

 

Autumn Film Club screenings

Southside Film Festival Film Club is returning with an exciting autumn season of music films in The Glad Cafe and two very special screenings for Halloween in Pollok House and Pollokshaws Burgh Hall.  

Glad Cafe screenings
On Tuesday 9 September we start the season with The Punk Singer, the 2013 documentary about Kathleen Hanna, who rose to international attention as the voice of the riot grrrl movement and was lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre. She became one of the most famously outspoken feminist icons of the era and this film tells us her story through 20 years of archival footage and intimate interviews. This screening will be followed by live music from local punk bank SHARPTOOTH.
On Tuesday 14 October there is a chance to see Pulp: a Film about Life, Death and Supermarkets, a documentary about the enduring career of Sheffield’s finest musical export, Pulp, who found fame on the world stage in the 1990’s with anthems including ‘Common People’ and ‘Disco 2000’. Directed by Florian Habicht, the band shares their thoughts on just about everything and gives a stunning performance exclusive to the film.
On Tuesday 4 November The Glad Cafe hosts a screening of We Are the Best! Directed by Swedish auteur Lukas Moodysson, We Are the Best! revolves around three girls in 1980’s Stockholm who decide to form a punk band – despite not having any instruments and being told by everyone that punk is dead.
Finishing The Glad Cafe music season on Tuesday 9 December is a film that needs no introduction: This is Spinal Tap. Rob Reiner’s cult mockumentary about the British heavy metal band is interspersed with powerful performances of Tap’s mesmerising music and profound lyrics, as the film candidly follows a rock group heading towards crisis. We will endeavour to turn the sound right up to 11!
Halloween screenings

On Friday 31 October there will be a screening of Don’t Look Now, Nicolas Roeg’s innovative, perception altering modern classic – preceded by a two course Italian-themed dinner with a glass of prosecco. This unique cinema and culinary experience will be held in the decadent surroundings of Pollok House, one of Scotland’s grandest Edwardian country homes. Sample a taste of Italy in the award winning Edwardian Kitchen restaurant and enjoy a pre-film drink in the scholarly surroundings of the Pavilion Library overlooking the gardens of the house, before being led through to the Maxwell family Dining Room for the screening of Don’t Look Now.  Advance booking is essential for this event and is strictly adults only. Full menu online soon. Email any dietary requirements to southsidefilmfest@gmail.com 

Following that on Sunday 2 November, Pollokshaws Burgh Hall hosts a screening of The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog, the 1927 silent thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. With its trick shots, menace and the quivering stare of Ivor Novello, this silent classic ishelped shape the modern-day thriller genre. Accompanied by live music on the mighty Wurlitzer Cinema Organ. 

Buy tickets online for all screenings at Brown Paper Tickets 

Autumn 2014 Film Club screenings

Southside Film Festival Film Club is returning with an exciting autumn season of music films in The Glad Cafe and two very special screenings for Halloween in Pollok House and Pollokshaws Burgh Hall.  

Glad Cafe screenings
On Tuesday 9 September we start the season with The Punk Singer, the 2013 documentary about Kathleen Hanna, who rose to national attention as the voice of the riot grrrl movement and was lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre. She became one of the most famously outspoken feminist icons of the era and this film tells us her story through 20 years of archival footage and intimate interviews. This screening will be followed by live music from local punk bank SHARPTOOTH.

On Tuesday 14 October there is a chance to see Pulp: a Film about Life, Death and Supermarkets, a documentary about the enduring career of Sheffield’s finest musical export, Pulp, who found fame on the world stage in the 1990’s with anthems including ‘Common People’ and ‘Disco 2000’. Directed by Florian Habicht, the band shares their thoughts on just about everything and gives a stunning performance exclusive to the film.
On Tuesday 4 November The Glad Cafe hosts a screening of We Are the Best!Directed by Swedish auteur Lukas Moodysson, We Are the Best! revolves around three girls in 1980’s Stockholm who decide to form a punk band – despite not having any instruments and being told by everyone that punk is dead.
Finishing The Glad Cafe music season on Tuesday 9 December is a film that needs no introduction:This is Spinal Tap. Rob Reiner’s cult mockumentary about the British heavy metal band is interspersed with powerful performances of Tap’s mesmerising music and profound lyrics, as the film candidly follows a rock group heading towards crisis. We will endeavour to turn the sound right up to 11!
Halloween screenings

On Friday 31 October there will be a screening of Don’t Look Now, Nicolas Roeg’s innovative, perception altering modern classic – preceded by a two course Italian-themed dinner with a glass of prosecco. This unique cinema and culinary experience will be held in the decadent surroundings of Pollok House, one of Scotland’s grandest Edwardian country homes.
Sample a taste of Italy in the award winning Edwardian Kitchen restaurant and enjoy a pre-film drink in the scholarly surroundings of the Pavilion Library overlooking the gardens of the house, before being led through to the Maxwell family Dining Room for the screening of Don’t Look Now. 
Advance booking is essential for this event and is strictly adults only. Full menu online soon. Email any dietary requirements to southsidefilmfest@gmail.com 

Following that on Sunday 2 November, Pollokshaws Burgh Hall hosts a screening of The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog,the 1927 silent thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. With its trick shots, menace and the quivering stare of Ivor Novello, this silent classic is helped shape the modern-day thriller genre. Accompanied by live music on the mighty Wurlitzer Cinema Organ. 

Buy tickets online from Brown Paper Tickets for all screenings 

Do you want to join Southside Film Festival?

Southside Film Festival was founded in 2011 as a response to the lack of local cinema on the Southside. In 2014, there are plans for a local cinema in Shawlands and a multiplex at Silverburn so the film festival thinks this is a good time to refocus the aims and objectives of the festival. 


We are establishing an Advisory Board to help steer the next stage of Southside Film Festival’s development and want to hear from anyone that is interested in joining us at this exciting time. 
  
We are particularly are interested in hearing from filmmakers, writers, musicians, artists and other creative practitioners based in the Southside of Glasgow who have a passion for cinema going and film in all its forms. 

We are also keen to hear from those with experience in community arts development /fundraising, audience development, journalism and business. 

However, do also please get in touch if you just love the Southside and want to support a positive cultural initiative in your community or love film and filmmaking.   
We expect that we will have Quarterly Advisory Board Meetings and that board members will be asked to contribute ideas and expertise as appropriate. 

The Board positions are voluntary but, as per the festival’s Volunteer Policy, expenses will be covered.  


NB We are also looking for New Volunteers-Treasurer & Secretary-find out more here

Southside Film Festival is a volunteer run film festival, film club and film event producer which operates as Community Interest Company (SC418100).  

Find out more about Southside Film Festival here:

Please apply by sending your CV and web link (if applicable) to southsidefilmfest@gmail.com along with a statement explaining  what you bring to the Advisory Board and why you want to support Southside Film Festival. 

Deadline is midnight 31st August, 2014. 

If you have any questions please email Karen O’Hare on southsidefilmfest@gmail.com. 

Call for Volunteers-Treasurer and Secretary

Southside Film Festival was founded in 2011 as a response to the lack of local cinema on the Southside. In 2014, there are plans for a local cinema in Shawlands and a multiplex at Silverburn so the film festival thinks this is a good time to refocus the aims and objectives of the festival. Are you interested in joining us?

We are looking for new volunteers to join the festival to help with the organisational elements of all our activity.  In particular we are looking for a new Secretary and a new Treasurer to take up key roles in the film festival organisation.  

However, if you are interested in getting involved with the festival in other capacities then do get in touch. We are always keen to support those looking for experience in FOH, marketing, programming and event production. 

The amount of time you commit to volunteering is dependent on the role –the Treasurer and Secretary will have to commit approximately half a day a month to festival activity and to attend monthly meetings in the Southside and screenings when possible. For the other volunteers roles, you can give as much time as you are able to supporting film screenings and events, talks and workshops in the Southside.  

All positions are voluntary but as per the festival’s Volunteer Policy, expenses will be covered.  

Southside Film Festival is a volunteer run film festival, film club and film event producer which operates as Community Interest Company (SC418100).  

Find out more about Southside Film Festival here: 
http://southsidefilm.co.uk/ 
https://www.facebook.com/SouthsideFilmFestival
http://twitter.com/southfilmfest

Please apply by sending your CV and web link (if applicable) to southsidefilmfest@gmail.com along with a statement explaining  what you bring to the festival and why you want to support Southside Film Festival. Please indicate if you are applying for the Secretary or Treasurer Role or what other area you would like to get experience in.  

Deadline is midnight 31 August, 2014

If you have any questions please email Karen O’Hare on southsidefilmfest@gmail.com 

Call for Advisory Board Members

Southside Film Festival was founded in 2011 as a response to the lack of local cinema on the Southside. In 2014, there are plans for a local cinema in Shawlands and a multiplex at Silverburn so the film festival thinks this is a good time to refocus the aims and objectives of the festival. 

We are establishing an Advisory Board to help steer the next stage of Southside Film Festival’s development and want to hear from anyone that is interested in joining us at this exciting time. 
  
We are particularly are interested in hearing from filmmakers, writers, musicians, artists and other creative practitioners based in the Southside of Glasgow who have a passion for cinema going and film in all its forms. 

We are also keen to hear from those with experience in community arts development /fundraising, audience development, journalism and business. 

However, do also please get in touch if you just love the Southside and want to support a positive cultural initiative in your community or love film and filmmaking.   

We expect that we will have Quarterly Advisory Board Meetings and that board members will be asked to contribute ideas and expertise as appropriate. 

The Board positions are voluntary but, as per the festival’s Volunteer Policy, expenses will be covered.  

Southside Film Festival is a volunteer run film festival, film club and film event producer which operates as Community Interest Company (SC418100).  

Find out more about Southside Film Festival here:
http://southsidefilm.co.uk/ 
https://www.facebook.com/SouthsideFilmFestival 
http://twitter.com/southfilmfest

Please apply by sending your CV and web link (if applicable) to southsidefilmfest@gmail.com along with a statement explaining  what you bring to the Advisory Board and why you want to support Southside Film Festival. 

Deadline is midnight 31 August, 2014

If you have any questions please email Karen O’Hare on southsidefilmfest@gmail.com

June 2014 Screenings in The Glad Cafe

We have a busy June ahead-check out our upcoming screenings in The Glad Cafe

Wed 4 June
Bullhead/ Rundskop (124mins, Cert 15, 2012
8pm (doors 7.30pm)
£6/£5 conc -on the door only, no advance sales  

A steroid-fueled cattle farmer finds that his decision to do business with the Belgian cattle-hormone mafia could have potentially deadly consequences in this brooding Belgian crime drama that was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2012 Academy Awards.


Flemish actor Matthias Schoenaerts spent two years transforming his slender body into a bulky and brooding figure which Variety called ” a career defining, powerfully physical lead performance. ” 
Also starring Matthias Schoenaerts from Rust and Bone

Michael R. Roskam’s debut feature Bullhead is a harrowing tale of revenge, redemption and fate. Watch the trailer http://vimeo.com/36443234

Indiewire: “stunning in its originality”


The Guardian describes Bullhead as ‘rustic noir’ & ‘Belgian gangster gothic’ 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/jan/31/bullhead-review
http://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2013/feb/01/bullhead-video-review


The film will be preceded by a short film called ‘Lekker’ directed by Sam Batnik about the Dutch language.


Thurs 5 June -re scheduled Cinemap screening
Southsider shorts (N/C contains some adult content, approx 60mins)
8pm (doors 7.30pm)
FREE

Join us for the re-scheduled Cinemap screening of a diverse range of short films made by Southside filmmakers.

Expect superheroes, local heroes, music fans, pets, strained family relationships and experimental shorts. Q&A with Southside filmmakers following the screening (TBC). 

Full film info here: http://southsidefilm.co.uk/film-club/southside-filmmaker-screening-east.html



Tues 17 June 
Refugee Week Scotland: 
Migration Stories-short films from Scotland, Brazil & Spain
8pm (doors 7.30pm)
£6/£5 conc/free to asylum seekers and refugees -on the door only, no advance sales




Southside Film Festival & Document International Human Rights Film Festival present three shorts that explore what life is like for immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers in Scotland, Brazil and Spain.

  •  Bird Man of Red Roa(Chris Leslie, 2013, Scotland, 6 mins)

Chris Leslie will be in attendance for a post film Q &A

  •  Diarios de Frontera (Irene Gutierrez Tores, 2013, Spain, 25mins)
  • Open Arms Closed Doors (Fernada Polacow & Johana Borges, 2013, Brazil, 25mins)

Cinemap 23-25 May 2014

Cinemap: mapping the Southside through film: 23-25 May 2014
After three successful years of running a film festival in May Southside Film Festival is doing something different in May 2014. 

Cinemap is inspired by the ALBERT DRIVE project in Pollokshields in 2013 which asked the question ‘Who is my Neighbour?’ Throughout the year ALBERT DRIVE explored different ways to bring people together in the Pollokshields community and some of the resulting films from this project are screening as part of Cinemap. 

Cinemap also includes films that explore the idea of neighbourhood, local and community and work by Southside filmmakers that is not necessarily about those themes, the only connection is that the filmmakers are based locally. We hope you enjoy the resulting diversity of new film work.

Cinemap is not only about bringing people together to watch films though -you can discover  new Southside spaces, learn more about the films through the filmmaker Q&As and post film discussions and have fun at all of the associated events. You never know you may even meet your neighbour!  
All screenings/events are free.


Cinemap programme:



Cinemap is a partnership project lead by Southside Film Festival with the ALBERT DRIVE project, Art Village, The Glad Cafe, Govanhill Baths, New Victoria Gardens, East Pollokshields Quad, Tramway and filmmakers Abigail Howkins and Basharat Khan. .

Cinemap: mapping the Southside through film 23-25 May 2014

After three successful years of running a film festival in May Southside Film Festival has decided to do something different in May 2014!

Southside Film Festival presents Cinemap, a screening event over the weekend of 23-25 May, 2014 in various Southside locations.


Cinemap is inspired by last year’s ALBERT DRIVE project that asked the people of Pollokshields to meet their neighbours through a series of artistic commissions exploring the central question ‘who is my neighbour’? 

Cinemap will screen a number of ALBERT DRIVE films including work by Basharat Khan and Abigail Howkins which explore the theme of neighbour but also highlight the importance of local, of community and of bringing people together. 
  • Cinemap is looking for more films that explore the wider Southside community and the themes of COMMUNITY and LOCAL. We are looking for films that have imaginative approaches to these themes. 
  • We are also looking for new work made in Southside Glasgow and/or made by Southside filmmakers that has not screened at previous Southside Film Festivals. 
  • We are also inviting filmmakers to submit site specific work that responds to and relate to the Cinemap screening spaces- Shawlands ArcadeThe Glad CafeGovanhill BathsNew Victoria Gardens and East Pollokshields Quad and The Tramway. What would you screen in a shopping centre, a cafe, a swimming pool, an allotment, a green space in a tenement back court and a multi arts venue? 
How to Submit: download a submission form and return to southsidefilmfest@gmail.com along with film
Submission Deadline: (9am, Monday 14 April, 2014)
DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 9AM TUES 22 APRIL, 2014

Cinemap is a partnership project lead by Southside Film Festival with the ALBERT DRIVE project, Art Village, The Glad Cafe, Govanhill Baths, New Victoria Gardens, East Pollokshields Quad, The Tramway and filmmakers Abigail Howkins and Basharat Khan.


Cinemap: mapping the Southside through film: 23-25 May 2014

N.B. We are also looking for new volunteers to help with the Cinemap project. If you are interested please email southsidefilmfest@gmail.com with your CV and availability and tell us how you would like to get involved.  Deadline to apply for volunteering is also 9am, Monday 14 April, 2014.


March: Good Vibrations

The Film Club continues at the Glad Cafe on 11 March at 8pm as we screen Good Vibrations, the story of Terri Hooley, the rebellious Belfast punk enthusiast whose record label released the Undertones’s Teenage Kicks.


The film will start at 8pm, doors at 7:30pm. Tickets are £6 (£5 for concessions) and are available from The Glad Cafe and Tickets Scotland.

All Film Club screenings are held at The Glad Cafe, 1006a Pollokshaws Road, Shawlands (opposite the five-a-side football pitches).

Synopsis: Terri Hooley is a radical, rebel and music-lover in 1970s Belfast when the bloody conflict known as the Troubles shuts down his city. As all his friends take sides and take up arms, Terri opens a record shop on the most bombed half-mile in Europe and calls it Good Vibrations. Through it he discovers a compelling voice of resistance in the city’s nascent underground punk scenes. Galvanising the young musicians into action, he becomes the unlikely leader of a motley band of kids and punks who join him in his mission to create a new community, an alternative Ulster, to bring his city back to life.

Good Vibrations (dir. Lisa Barros D’Sa)
The Glad Cafe
Cert 15, 2013 (102mins)
Tuesday 11 March, 8pm

April: Blue Velvet

The April screening at the Film Club is Blue Velvet, David Lynch’s bizarre mystery starring Kyle MacLachlan and Isabella Rossellini.


The film will start at 8pm, doors at 7:30pm. Tickets are £6 (£5 for concessions) and are available from The Glad Cafe and Tickets Scotland.

All Film Club screenings are held at The Glad Cafe, 1006a Pollokshaws Road, Shawlands (opposite the five-a-side football pitches).

Synopsis: The discovery of a severed human ear found in a field leads a young man on an investigation related to a beautiful, mysterious nightclub singer and a group of criminals who have kidnapped her child.

Blue Velvet (dir. David Lynch)
The Glad Cafe
Cert 18, 1986 (120mins)
Tuesday 8 April, 8pm

May: Nebraska

The Film Club season ends with a screening of Nebraska, directed by Alexander Payne (Sideways, The Descendants) and starring Bruce Dern and Bob Odenkirk.


The film will start at 8pm, doors at 7:30pm. Tickets are £6 (£5 for concessions) and are available from The Glad Cafe and Tickets Scotland.

All Film Club screenings are held at The Glad Cafe, 1006a Pollokshaws Road, Shawlands (opposite the five-a-side football pitches).

Synopsis: After receiving a sweepstakes letter in the mail, a cantankerous father thinks he’s struck it rich, and wrangles his son into taking a road trip to claim the fortune. Shot in black and white across four states, Nebraska tells the stories of family life in the heartland of America.

Nebraska (dir. Alexander Payne)
The Glad Cafe
Cert 15, 2013 (110mins)
Sunday 11 May, 8pm

February: Annie Hall

The new Film Club season in partnership with The Glad Cafe kicks-off on Tuesday 11 February at 8pm with a screening of Woody Allen’s classic romantic comedy Annie Hall starring the director as a typically neurotic television writer and Diane Keaton as his eccentric on-again, off-again girlfriend.



The film will start at 8pm, doors at 7:30pm. Tickets are £6 (£5 for concessions) and are available from The Glad Cafe.

All Film Club screenings are held at The Glad Cafe, 1006a Pollokshaws Road, Shawlands (opposite the five-a-side football pitches).

Synopsis: This fictionalised account of the rise and fall of a “nervous romance” between Jewish New York comic Alvy Singer (Allen) and the willowy, Waspy Annie Hall (Diane Keaton) was the high-water mark of Allen’s gift for sublimely touching and funny screen comedy. It is a gloriously convincing romance, packed with superb gags. Annie Hall also virtually invented the relationship comedy in both movies and literature; it made possible the now degraded romcom genre, and on TV it spawned Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Sex and the City, and Entourage – though none of these have anything like Annie Hall’s passionate romantic pain.” The Guardian

Annie Hall (dir. Woody Allen)
The Glad Cafe
Cert 15, 1977 (93mins)
Tuesday 11 February 8pm

We’re Back: FILM CLUB Spring 2014 is GO!

With January (finally) drawing to a close, we hope you’ve all just about recovered from the festive period and are getting ready to get properly tore in 2014.
There’s no denying that awards season is now in full swing – with Oscar worthy performances flying around all over the shop (whats your bets for 2014?) . However, in the midst of all the movie mayhem, we at the Southside Film Festival have been busy bees planning this season’s Film Club selection for screening at The Glad Cafe. After much deliberation & debate, we hope you’ll agree that we’ve came up with a cracker of programme for Spring 2014. 
So, without further ado – we are very pleased announce this season’s line up in full:
With a pretty eclectic mix of movies on the go – we’re sure we’ve got something for everyone so keep your eyes peeled for further updates, special features & general fun stuff in the near future. 
Tickets will be on sale soon, and as ever, will be available online at Tickets Scotland, in person at The Glad Cafe or on the door on the night of the screening. 

Cityscapes & Heartbreaks

With December finally upon us, we hope you’re all starting to feel festive here in the Southside. We’re sure there’s plenty a Christmassy movie nights up your sleeve in the coming weeks but we’d like to kick-start all of that for you with our December Film Club screening of In Bruges – Tues 3rd Dec at The Glad Cafe (8pm – doors 7:30pm – Tickets £6/5 conc,)
Hit men Ray & Ken have very different takes on the beautifully preserved Flemish city, but as the two swan around sampling the biers & battling the locals one thing becomes clear – where Brendan Gleeson is super likeable & Colin Farrell pretty as can be, its the city of Bruges itself that’s the real star of the show!
That got me thinking, what other films are there where the location becomes a character in itself? Films that couldn’t (or at least shouldn’t) ever be set anywhere else in the world? Films that when you watch, you end up with a serious case of the wanderlust & find yourself booking mini break before the end credits roll…….
Here’s my top picks
Lost In Translation
I love Scarlett. I LOVE Bill. I love My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus & Mary Chain & I love the whole Coppola clan. But the thing I love most about Lost In Translation? Tokyo! The dazzling cityscapes framed through Charlotte’s lonely hotel room window, that sense of awe & wonder you get from Bob’s taxi journey, the Karaoke scenes. For all the chemistry & quick witted banter – Tokyo is the main character here and never has a film made me want to travel to city more than this one. 
Dont Look Now

OK, so Donald Sutherland & Julie Christie grieving the tragic death of their little daughter on the canals of Venice doesn’t particularly intrigue me towards the city. Gone are the romantic notions of gondolas in the moonlight, replaced with chilling paranoia, alienation, grief & guilt……and a wee bit of the occult. The imagery created by the water of the weaving canals is so intense, its impossible to imagine the emotional trauma of this film translating to any other setting. Oh, that water…..I’ve got the chills!
Mulholland Drive
A Lynchian nightmare of epic proportions, and another on the list that doesn’t particularly endear me towards the city in question but all out encapsulates the seedy essence of  L.A. The grotesque underbelly of the City of Angels on full display in a fragmented, hallucinatory & nightmarish illusion of a film – “a mournful love poem to all those who have been chewed up & spit out by the Hollywood machine” – Keith Ulhich/Time Out
Manhattan

“He adored New York City. He idolised it all out of proportion
No, make that he romantiscied it all out of proportion.
To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black & white and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin” – Woody Allen, Manhattan
Woody Allen, the quintessential New Yorker – you could really pick any of his earlier films here to showcase the Big Apple in all its glory, but its Manhattan that truly is his all out love letter to his home town. Enough said!
What would be your picks here? Amelie‘s quirky Paris? Scorcese’s hard hitting Boston in The Departed, Love Actually’s Christmas-time in London? Let us know in the comments below.

Speaking of wonderful cities, all of us at The Southside Film Festival would like to express our heartfelt sympathies to the families & friends of those who tragically lost their lives in Glasgow this weekend at The Clutha Vaults Pub. There have been so many wonderful displays of kindness & compassion by the Glasgow people over the last few days, which just goes to show what an amazing city we really have.  

To express our condolences, we would like to advise that we will be donating all box office profits from our screening of In Bruges to an appropriate fund for the families of the bereaved and the pub rebuilding fund once announced. We’ll also have donation tins there if people want to donate and will let you know where it all goes. xxx 



A Scottish Wrestling Fan’s Journey to the Candelabra

On November 5th, the SouthSide Film Festival are showing this year’s hit movie, Behind The Candelabra focusing on the fascinating true story of outrageous pianist/entertainer Liberace and his lover Scott Thorson. 
You may have read the title and wondered what exactly my journey was to this movie. Well, I’m a huge fan of American wrestling. You know Hulk Hogan and The Rock type of stuff. Anyway, when I was younger I got a videotape of the first ever ‘WrestleMania’ event from 1985. The main event was packed with stars like Hulk Hogan, Muhammad Ali as a referee but the one man, that I never forgot was the guest time keeper for the evening, Liberace. He danced around the wrestling ring in an outrageous outfit with The Rockettes. That image remained with me for over 20 years.


A couple of years ago, I remember reading an article in the Metro newspaper about a new movie on the life of Liberace. I immediately pictured the dancing pianist from back in 1990 on VHS. Fast forward to 2013, add in an outstanding performance from Michael Douglas as ‘Lee’ and a mesmerizing performance by Matt Damon as his lover, Scott and you have Behind The Candelabra. This movie is can’t miss. From the camp, catchy showtunes to the moments of real emotion and harsh truths of celebrity, you won’t be disappointed.


The film will be shown at The Glad Cafe at 8pm as part of our Autumn Film Club. Doors open at 7:30. Tickets are £6 (£5 for concessions) and are available directly at the Glad Cafe or online from Tickets Scotland (booking fee applies)